About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 24
CSPAN2 14
CNN 8
CNNW 8
SFGTV2 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
WUSA (CBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
WTTG 2
FBC 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 94
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50s arm every day. -- 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. the king collect information. -- they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. a convicted on facebook. -- you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. publicly it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. -- hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program a
training techniques, new learning technologies that are helping them to deal with these potential threats which i think is giving them more and more confidence. >> when you look at what -- there are anny nor mouse number of lessons that were learned in these. we're already transition away to operations other than counter insurgency operations. at the same time the national security strategy says we have to preserve some of those skills. how do you preserve these skills that are very experienced based, over the long term, so that if we find ourselves in a situation five, sir, seven, eight years from now, whether you're active guard and reserves you are going to have the skill set necessary? >> so this week we just finished publishing brand-new doctrine. we published all of the army doctrine which is the foundation of how we train and how we resource and so we've published -- we're redoing counter insurgency. we're looking at stability operations, which is kind of what we're talking about as we transition from counter insurgency to stability. we're incorporating the lessons learned into our
changed over the last 20 or 30 years. technology has made us more productive but it has also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. mobil trade brought us cheaper products but it also means jobs overseas in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks getting squeezed. even when corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. guaranteed pensions and health care starting to erode or disappear altogether. the rise of global competition, those are real. we can't wish them away. here is what i know. and we can meet those challenges. we are americans. we have the world's best entrepreneurs, and tests, researchers, colleges, universities. we have the most innovative workers. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. there is not a country on earth that would not gladly trade places with the united states. to secure a future that we want for our kids and our grandkids, we have to make a choice right now. in five days, we will choose our next president. [applause] and, boulder, it is more than just a choice between two candidates or parties. you will be making a choice
's face it, the middle class was getting hammered, long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive but also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceos' salaries exploded and pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. and these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. we can't wish these and global competition wlsh here's what i know, wisconsin, we can meet that because we're americans, and we have the world's best workers and the world's best aupt paren irs. we have the best scientists and the best researchers, the best colleges and ooufrtsz, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. in this new century and there's not a country in the earth that wouldn't change places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose ou
hammered long before the financial crisis hit. technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing. in these fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, they're real. can' away. but here's what i know, wisconsin. we can meet them. because we're americans. we've got the world's best workers and the best entrepreneurs. we've got the best scientists and the best researchers. the best colleges and universities, and we've got the most innovative spirit. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy in this new century, and there's not a country on earth that wouldn't trade places with the united states of america. but we have a choice to make. in five days we will choose our next president. and it's more than just a choice betwe
technologies like clean energy and fuel efficient cars. we know that our country is stronger when we can count on affordable health insurance and medicare and social security. when we protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution. when there are rules in place to make sure we're not taking advantage of by credit card companies or mortgage lenders or unscrupulous financial institutions. we know we're better off when politicians in washington aren't allowed to make decisions about health care that women are perfectly capable of making for themselves. that's what we believe. that's the vision that we embrace. i appreciate that. governor romney now, he's got an entirely different view about what this country is about. don't boo. vote. vote. he's been running around saying he's got a five-point plan for the economy. turns out it's a one-point plan. those at the top get to play by a different set of rules than you do. they get to pay lower tax rates. outsource jobs, they want to let wall street run wild, make reckless bets with other folks' money. that was the philosophy as ceo, as gover
to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreign humanitarian response, that a lot of our military capabilities are not just for overseas foreign disasters but it also allows the military to be trained and certified to respond to local domestic disaster situations as well. i had mentioned that we had 22 nations participating in rimpac and this slide is a representation of the military and civilian partners that we had participating in this event. and we had many, many international partners and we had a lot of domestic partners: medical and military editionary partners as well. okay, this is our command and control slide. we took a lot of care to get this right. we wanted to make sure that we portra
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
in the power of technology. we believe in the power of people when technology works for you. to dream. to create. to work. if you're going to do something. make it matter. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. i'i invest in what i know.r. i turned 65 last week. i'm getting married. planning a life. there are risks, sure. but, there's no reward without it. i want to be prepared for the long haul. i see a world bursting with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guy
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a belter tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's about 8:00 p.m. eastern time two fridays before the election and according to the app on my iphone, we have 10 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes and 53 seconds before the polls close. accord dog every one of what seems like a thousand polls taken this week, this thing say true dead heat. so what are the candidates up to? they are releasing new ads every day. it's said that character is what we do when no one is looking. mitt romney thought no one was looking when he attacked 47% of americans. his company shipped jobs overseas. >> higher deficits, chronic unemployment, a president who admits he can't work with congress. >> you can't change
the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailors was superb. and we had absolutely first-class leadership in the navy. you will hear later today from admiral gary some examples of just how impressive that leadership is. the operational readiness of the fleet was a result, first of all, of having bases all around the world. but secondly because the strong program of exercise we conducted. the exercises were not only conducted on military scenarios, but we had an extensive set of exercises involved in humanitarian response. during the time i was secretary, we had a disaster response very similar to the one they're doing here in san francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even
can clean this mess with half as many sheets. bounty has trap and lock technology to soak up big spills and lock them in. why use more when you can use less? bounty. the clean picker upper. why use more when you can use less? see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. vsp members can save on all authentic transitions lenses, including our new transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. nyquil (stuffy): just reading whatyour label.ing? wait! you relieve nasal congestion? tylenol: sure. don't you? tylenol (another bottle): hmmm...no... nyquil (stuffy): dude! anncr vo: tylenol cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion... nyquil cold & flu doesn't. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. m
change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes to talk to a kid. i sometim
much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. this is your body there. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep numr we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-but only while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >> obama administration facing accusations it did not use all of its resources to save the americans in benghazi. pat roberts
of a recent conference from detroit focusing on manufacturing technology and entrepreneurial activity in u.s. urban areas, techonomy detroit was a one-day conference in mid september at wayne state university. this portion of the conference includes a panel on do-it-yourself manufacturing and remarks by ben kaufman, the 25-year-old founder and ceo of quirky, a consumer product company that lets consumers decide what they produce. this portion of the conference is just under an hour.ciat >> so the next full segment ofe this program is going to be devoted to the topic of manufacturing and the future of manufacturing in the united states. so i'd like to bring out my longtime colleague when i was at fortune magazine, erick schonfeld, many years the editor of tech crunch. erick schonfeld, please, come out to lead your session on the diy economy. so thank you, erick. [applause] >> thank you. it's great to be here. h let me just quickly introduce our panelists. please have a seat. to my immediate left is grady burnett who's vice president of global marketing at facebook and lived in ann arbor for
is, how we take this to the next question? obama has a plan to do that with technology, research and development. host: we are speaking tim ryan, from the youngstown area of ohio. mike from houston, texas on our line for republicans. caller: good morning. i grew up in ohio. i have family there for 50 years. my concern here, congressman, class of 1983. my concern here congressman is that, i look at the democrats and i see a party that desires to command and control the economy. i see where, in houston, i've been here 20 years now new york houston we had an oil bust in 1985. the government didn't bail out houston but houston is home to 150,000 californians from the past 10 years alone. texas was not bailed out but now houston is host city to the world's largest medical center. it is growing faster than any large city in the united states. and no federal money. it is not a command and control economy. it has more free market and no state income tax and look at california as a case study they've lost 350,000 people to texas alone in the last 10 years. texas is growing, california is
. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ male announcer ] it's time for medicare open enrollment. are you ready? time to compare plans and see what's new. you don't have to make changes, but it's good to look. maybe you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to create custom emails tha
to do that this year as the technology changes, internet develops, pretty straightforward to go to a website to donate, put in a credit card number. we are all familiar with that. so the campaign's top of that. that was very successful in the obama's campaign, and it continues to be, even though as an incumbent you can raise a lot of big contributions. direct contribution to the candidates are still limited. only $2,500 per election. there are also still prohibitions on who can give money to the candidates, corporations, unions, other associations, not permitted to make contributions. that has been the law for more than 40 years. they are allowed to spend their own money independently of the campaign if they want to put cannot make such a patient. typically, presidential candidates raise money at the maximum level, they are well known nationally, lots of wealthy individuals and groups that want to support them. the obama campaign stands out in that respect of it. it is also importantthan 40 yea. they are allowed to spend their own to note, the caller is making another race has b
landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact
: technology, carl cameron, rolling on the bus. carl, thank you. ♪ ♪ >> bret: this is a fox news alert. late breaking details in the ongoing scandal on the attack of the u.s. consulate on benghazi, libya, that killed the u.s. ambassador and three others there. fox news obtained a new document that sheds new light on the days before that attack. chief white house correspondent ed henry is live at the white house with the latest. >> good evening, bret. this is a cable sent to secretary of state clinton's office at the state department showing that there was emergency meeting on august 15 at the u.s. mission in benghazi. significant because that is less than a month before the terror attack there. at this emergency meeting we're told, based on the cable, there was concern expressed by officials on the ground in benghazi that there were al-qaeda training camps there. there could be problems for from that. the cable says the regional security officer expressed concern with the ability to defend the post in event of the coordinated attack due to limited manpower, security measures, weapons capabil
stuff and cool technology, we got back to the point where we had to fly download over back.and over the battlefield to get these guys to shoot at us that we could find them because for instance the army and marine helicopters were common and they can't protect themselves against missiles in tripoli. so kind of degenerated back into that. so i talk a little bit about that. it was fine over back dad one day and i'd heard some guy from the flavor for me talking about seeing a bear. and i'm thinking he's sniffing glue or his oxygen system is contaminated or something not right. i've looked at us i saw a giraffe from across baghdad. all the wild animals were running but it shows something you don't think about, you don't expect. stuff like that is a matter. and that kind of close is on what i think is a positive note. you know, i don't like it when you read nonfiction and the writers kind of had this catharsis may bleed all over the pages and you walk away thinking that was heavy, though his deep. this is a little bit more positive. again, how i saw it and how it felt to come home from y
. 2012] >> tomorrow morning, we will talk about how polls are conducted and analyze. new technology challenges the industry. scott is our guest followed by a spotlight on colorado beginning with an overview of the state with curtis hubbard the denver post. and we will see how the republicans are campaigning with strategist sean tonner. and in analysis of president obama's strategy to elected democrats with rick palacio. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have a simple proposition. you can embrace the kind of approaches he has embraced. -- she has embraced. it has no new revenue, even for the wealthiest americans. it would require cuts in social security and medicare. or we can embrace a balanced approach. that is what i support. we can go back to the kind of rates we had under the clinton administration when people were doing well and the economy was growing. we're going to have to make tough choices. >> your bottle? >> it is amazing to me you can stand here having voted for chilean dollar deficits for the last four years, the largest increase in amer
to take out bad cases, but they need to be hitting targets, and it's not so much the technology. >> anybody else have a question or anybody want to answer the question. >> do you think we should fighting war against the terrorist at this point or should we not, and if you do, is the way we're going about it an effective way or a way to cause -- those are the two big questions. i happen to think that if you -- what i think al-qaeda's still a problem, i grant that it is a difficult political problem for a president to say we won, and it's over. if you say it prematurely, get attacked next week, that's the end of your presidency. it's going to be over before somebody says that. >> lick benghazi. >> it happened, you know? that was local militants, not al-qaeda from above, but people, lose distinctions quickly in terms of politics, but i think there's still a reason to use them now. i don't think we're at the point yet where there's no cost. there's no reason not to use it. you want to be careful about the incentive question that you're not treating it like a hammer and everything li
about the resolve and the resiliencke of these people. technology obviously was impacted so in order to get us a letter in the quickest amount of time possible, they typed it on an old typewriter, took a picture of it and emailed us the jpeg. no scaner, nothing like that, it was a jpeg of a leg. i said, good enough, it's a letter. we took that to ann kronenberg and said here we are, what can we do. in the meantime we did some brain storms, is this something real, is there any value we can add to this scenario? what we came up with was obviously we don't have the deep pockets to send over rebuilding teams or send over thousands and thousands of tons of material, that's just not what we could do. but what we could do is assemble a small team to go on a mission to van and meet them and talk to them and find out more about what do they need and is there an intersection of what we can do for them and in the meantime it gives us an opportunity to really look and see what the situation was and what we can take away from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in g
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health car
people so they can get decent jobs and start growing again. to invest in science and technology and research. that's a better economic plan than one more round of tax cuts spending by a 22% cut on on education, science, and technology. it is bad for youngstown state, and obama's plan is better for the future of america. obama's education plan is better for the future of america. he is committed to hiring 100,00 0 new science, technology, and math teachers. committed to cutting the rate of inflation of college costs in half and to the student loan reform program, the single most important thing nobdody knows about. this alone justifies his reelection if you believe in the future. the old student loan system worked like -- the federal government paid the banks to make loands and guaranteed 93% of the loans. the new system -- under that old system, it meant we dropeped to 16th in the world in college degrees. a perscription for disaster. almost every job is created by someone with a degree. we can't afford to be 16th in the world. so what did the president and congress do? what did
could do and bringing new technologies to north dakota. when i served on the commission and attorney general, i went to minnesota and hard-fought for the coal industry. i heard a lignite leader award. i am as committed to north dakota's energy industry as anyone can become a and i did not know there could be a better advocate and someone who would stand and say have been there, i have this experience, i can get the job done, and i a understand what those challenges are. that is what i am hoping to do when i go to washington, d.c., represent this growing industry and include in it biofuels and wind which the republican party has been very hostile to production tax credits. using every form of energy to make it work in this country. >> obviously, there is a problem. keystone is not built. it is not built because the senate majority leader has not brought it up for a vote. our president has been a post it as well. our coal industry, one of the things that has stunned me is the epa came out with new regulations on coal plants, and it was so stringent you could not build a new coal plant
is it to drain sea water from 20 miles of subway tunnels? put some sham wows down there. we have the technology. put some sham wows down there. we have the technology. please! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. you can see how hurricane sandy has destroyed property and lives. now being blamed for 92 deaths in the united states. >> some 3.8 million utility customers in 13 states are still without electricity. most of them in new york and new jersey. new estimate says sandy will cause $50 billion in damage to the economy. that makes it the second most expensive storm in u.s. history, after hurricane katrina. >> nearly half of new york city's death from superstorm sandy happened on staten island. homeland secretary janet napolitano is going there today, where people say they're suffering and not getting enough help. anna werner, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you stand on this street in staten island you can clearly see the path of destruction wrought by hurricane sandy. cars picked up and tossed
with more brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. megyn: the last jobs report before the election getting very different reactions today. the unemployment rate went up and the white house sees an economy on the mend. now we are looking at the larger picture as americans prepare to pick our next president. that unemployment rate ticking up to 7.9% last month up from 7.8. among african-americans it's 14.3%. more than 3.5 million people have been jobless for at least a year and 5 million have been out of work for six months. and picture this. on average if you lost your job today it would take you until august of next year to find a new one. joining us now fox business network lou dobbs host of lou dobbs tonight. they say the numbers went up a little because folks are starting to look for jobs again. >> there is some truth to it. it's an irrelevant truth however. 7.9% means we still have 23 million americans, megyn in this country that are unemployment, u
within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ john: [applause] john: now, your comments or questis for my guests, columnist ellis henican and ann coulter. first, from my facebook page. david gerald asks, our guy, completely wrong. >> i think it is not exactly being wrong. conservatives aren't enthusiastic about the war in afghanistan. i think most conservative think itould have been better if mubarak said state and not be replaced by the muslim brotherhood. think that is very hard to explain in egypt. moreover, republicans, look, it's over. republicans are not democrats. we don't criticize military action that is already been taken for. conservatives understand that. i don't speak for romney. i don't know if i'm right about that, but i suspect. that is just an example of republicans not criticizing military action has already been taken. >> so, with the bush tax cuts. he did not get as what we needed.
quipped with high technology accessories like nice vision, high-tech cameras and they even see heat. >> they can save people in the middle of the night. >> reporter: once considered an expensive toy is seriously considered as a cleaner, safer, and less expensive way to save lives. report from dublin, cbs 5. >>> why are schools always on the chopping block when it come to the state budget? next, answers from governor brown. >> and days away from the november election. what bay area volunteers at this phone bank are considering voters to do. >> and lightning in a bottle? that is how this world series has been described. more highlights in sports. we will be right back. now... californians will dee whether to approve a tax increase favored by governor brown. the governor has been travel . >>> election day is nine days away and californians will decide whether to approve a proposition. this weekend volunteers are working phone banks. receipt polls show only 46% show support for the measure. prop 30 would show income taxes on the measure and raise sale's tax by a quarter of a percent
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)